Manicure Routine

1. Wash your hands and wrists in hot water with liquid soap for 20-30 seconds followed by a thorough drying with paper towels.

image coming soon

2. Wipe over both sides of the clients hands with a mild antiseptic to clean the hands without softening the nails. Ask your client to remove any jewellery and store away safely.

image coming soon

3. You may need to remove any nail varnish before assessing the condition of the client’s nails. Check for any contra-indications and discuss any conditions which may need addressing during treatment. The manicure procedure may commence on either the left or right hand.

image coming soon

4. Apply nail varnish remover with a cotton wool pad. Press the pad firmly onto the nail for a few seconds then slide it off the nail, squeezing gently against the nail plate to remove all traces of dissolved varnish. Carefully, pull back the nail walls from the sides of the nail plate to expose any hidden varnish. Use cotton wool wrapped

around an orange stick, which has been dipped in nail varnish remover, to work around the nail border to ensure it is completely clean.

image coming soon

5. Long nails may need trimming before filing. Discuss the desired length and shape with your client before cutting.

The most important thing to remember when considering nail shapes is what the client requires. Always ask if they have a preference, and talk them through the options.

A new mother, for example, will probably be best to avoid sharp points. Filing the nail into some styles will make it weaker and so is not recommended for those doing a lot of heavy work with their hands. It is worth having a board of tips which demonstrate the different shapes available.

A traditional rule of thumb when choosing nail shapes is for the free edge to mirror the shape of the eponychium. This should create a style best suited to your client’s hands. However, changing trends will affect what your client actually wants. Whilst you can advise them what would be best, it is essentially the client’s choice.

 

The rounded tip is a resilient and common shape which elongates the fingers, whilst the most classical style is known as the almond. This is filed away at the sides and is softly pointed at the tip. However, by filing the sides of the nail, you will be weakening it, and so your client should be warned accordingly.

 

Square nails are very popular, especially with a French polish. These are created by filing straight across the tip. This is better suited to longer nails, to avoid making hands look square. For those who like this style but are less adventurous, the ‘Squoval’ is a better option as the corners of the nail are rounded off.

6. Before cutting nails, you should consider using safety glasses for yourself and the client to prevent eye injury from nail clippings. Apply slight pressure from above when using the scissors to minimise disturbance at the base of the nail. Cut across the free edge, leaving the nail slightly longer than required.

image coming soon

7. File the nails from the sides to the centre towards the nail tip. Hold the file as near to the end as possible to produce long, flowing strokes and give the nails a smooth edge. Never saw backwards and forwards. Remember to check that your client is happy with the shape before proceeding to the next stage. Check that the free edges of all the nails are totally smooth and even

image coming soon

8. The buffer can be used to stimulate blood supply to the nail bed and smooth the nail as well as creating a shine. Apply between 15 and 20 light strokes per nail in one direction towards the free edge.

image coming soon

9. Buffing paste can be used in addition to the buffer to smooth out irregularities in the

surface of the nail and also give the nail a shine.

image coming soon

10. Use an orange stick to add cuticle cream to the clients nail and massage into the cuticles using your thumbs.

 

image coming soon

11. Soak the fingers of the hand that you are working on in a manicure bowl filled with warm, soapy water while you repeat steps 1-7 on the other hand.

 

image coming soon

12. Dry the hand thoroughly.

 

image coming soon

13. Apply cuticle remover to the end of an orange stick tipped with cotton wool. Using the hoof stick resting on the nail plate, gently push back the cuticle working in small circular movements.

 

image coming soon

14. Use cuticle cutters to remove any excess cuticle by placing the pointed end of the cutters under the lifted cuticle and make a clean cut.

 

Note: if the cuticle is cut and bleeding occurs, you must first put on disposable gloves before cleaning the area with antiseptic wipes. Any contaminated waste must be disposed of safely and separately from general waste.

 

image coming soon

15. The basic procedure of massage is made up of effleurage and petrissage movements. Effleurage movements are long and flowing and are performed with the fingers and palms of the hand using little pressure. You should both begin and end the massage with effleurage as it soothes the nerve endings and removes loose surface skin cells.

 

Petrissage is a deeper, circular kneading which has stimulating effects. It increases the rate at which blood flows through the skin and muscles and removes loose surface skin cells and waste matter.

 

Support your client’s arm with a bolster and then apply hand cream to the hand and

forearm before beginning the massage.

 

Begin your massage by using effleurage movements from the fingers to the elbow.

 

Follow on with palmar kneading (petrissage movements) the extensor muscles and the flexor muscles of the forearm.

Continue with circular frictions around the wrist, using the thumbs to massage in between the metacarpal spaces of the hand.

 

Starting at the little finger, massage down the fingers towards the matrix, squeezing and pulling each finger and thumb.

 

Flex and extend the wrist gently then rotate the wrist several times in each direction.

 

Thumb knead over the palm area before once more completing effleurage movements from the fingers to the elbow.

 

The massage will leave a film of grease on the nails which should be removed using nail varnish remover. Check that the nails are smooth and free of any surface debris before you start to paint them.

 

image coming soon

16. The client should then be advised to put any jewellery back on before the nail varnish is applied to avoid smudging. Also, ask your client if they would not mind paying their bill, getting their car keys out and even making their next appointment with you.

 

image coming soon

17. Apply one coat of base coat to every nail. You should always use a base coat, as not only will it stop coloured enamels from staining the nails, but it will also smooth out the nail plate before a coloured enamel is applied. If there are a lot of ridges on the nails, you can apply a ridge filler before the base coat. A base coat will also help the coloured enamel adhere better. Only one

coat of base coat is needed.

 

image coming soon

18. Apply two coats of varnish (if the polish is coloured, one if pearlised). Make sure that the varnish you intend to use is not too thick and that the brush is in good condition. Avoid shaking the bottle, as this will create air bubbles in the varnish. hold the client’s finger with your thumb, index and middle finger. Pull the brush out of the bottle away from you and remove the polish from the far side of the brush. Balance your hand and place the brush in the centre of the nail and apply gentle pressure to spread the bristles. Push back towards the eponychium and pull towards the free edge with a light pressure. Then, fill in either side of the nail before running the side of the brush along the free edge. Make sure not to touch the soft tissue around the nail plate by leaving a very small margin at the sidewalls and eponychium. Always use light strokes to create a smooth finish.

 

image coming soon

19.  Apply one coat of top coat. There are products available that help speed up the drying time of the varnish. These are useful additions as they prevent smudging of the varnish and also speed up the time taken for the treatment. All top coats are clear, but may come in different transparent colours. It is applied in the same way as base coat. This will give a lovely shine to the nail, it will also protect against chipping.

 

 

image coming soon

20. While the nails are drying, take the opportunity to check that the client is happy and go through any aftercare advice. You may wish to use a quick dry spray at this point to avoid the client sitting still for too long.

 

 

image coming soon

21. Once you have added the varnish, carefully use an orange stick with varnish remover to tidy up any errors.

 

 

image coming soon